Delivering the Sustainable Development Goals in India

by Mark Hoda, Jeevika Trustee

In the culmination of a three year process, at the end of September this year, the UN’s 193 member states met at a summit to agree 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) and 169 associated targets

Sustainable development can be defined as ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’.

The goals are to be achieved by 2030 and include ‘ending poverty in all its forms everywhere’.

The agreement also commits signatory countries to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls, ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all, and inclusive and sustainable economic growth.

India’s mixed record

The SDGs build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that were adopted in 2000 and were supposed to be delivered this year.

As a UN report looking back on MDG delivery notes, ‘India has made notable progress in achieving poverty reduction and other MDGs since their adoption at the turn of the century but this progress has been uneven and millions continue to remain trapped in extreme poverty’.

The report highlights the scale of this challenge in the world’s biggest poverty trap – ‘India remains home to one quarter of the world’s undernourished population, over a third of the world’s underweight children, and nearly a third of the world’s food-insecure people’.

Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas

The new Indian government elected last year is committed to a policy of Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas (‘Together with all, Development for all’) to achieve inclusive development.

As the UN report on India’s MDG record notes, looking forward to its SDG delivery prospects under a new government, ‘There seems to be a remarkable convergence of vision underlying the sustainable development goals and those of the Government, although it remains to be seen how effectively it implements its new strategic direction to provide a life of dignity to all’.

A framework of indicators against which to monitor progress in delivering the SDGs is being developed at UN level and according to press reports, there is scepticism amongst Indian NGOs that the goals will be achieved, especially in the absence of clearly defined monitoring processes and resource mobilisation.

Trade versus aid?

This week, India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, who coined the phrase ‘Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas’, visits the UK.

While aid may not feature on the agenda during Mr Modi’s visit (especially given that the UK Government has now stopped supporting development projects in India) trade very much will be. British multinationals are hoping to unveil $15 billion worth of trade and investment deals during the trip.

However, as discussed at Jeevika’s previous policy and corporate events, trade and aid must go hand in hand. India will not be able to transform itself into the economic powerhouse that its Government, people and key trading partners, such as the UK, so badly need unless it can lift hundreds of millions of its people out of abject poverty.

It is therefore vital that aid as well as trade is on the table in Modi’s discussions with political and corporate leaders in the UK this week.

Jeevika Trust is developing it’s ‘tri sector’ approach on how governments, businesses and NGOs can work together to eradicate poverty in India.

Notwithstanding the UK’s decision to stop aid to India, the British Government still provides important technical assistance to India which should be used to support the delivery of the SDGs in India.A newly-installed water pump in village India Likewise, Jeevika very much wants to see UK businesses with a relationship with India devote some of their considerable resources  and expertise to rural development projects, as a key part of their trade agreements. Doing so will not only fulfill an important moral duty, but will also help create massive new markets for their goods and services.

We will therefore be watching Mr Modi’s UK visit closely in the hope that such tri sector poverty eradication agreements will be very high on the agenda. Without such partnership working, India will surely struggle to meet the SDGs by 2030 and Mr Modi’s ‘Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas’ commitment.

 

Five reasons why RURAL India will shape our global future

by Michael Connellan, Jeevika Trustee

Rural India is the world’s biggest poverty trap…

Despite rapid global urbanisation, the majority of the world’s poor are rural – and a huge proportion of them are rural Indians. India’s 600,000 villages are home to a quarter of a billion people living on less than a dollar, or 50p, per day.

…But rural India is getting educated. Fast.

Literacy rates are improving in rural India at twice the rate of urban India.

And village India is rapidly getting online…

Hundreds of millions of Indians remain without internet access. But the Indian government is proposing an $11bn (US) plan to get rural India online to boost the rural economy.

… nonetheless, basic resources – including clean water – are often unavailable even if mobile phones are

629 million people in rural India live without proper sewage systems. This lack of sanitation costs lives. Diarrhoea kills 1,600 people daily across the country.

Rural India’s hope lies in its grassroots democracy, which has much to teach us

In the 1990s, the Indian government introduced a law reserving spaces for women on every village panchayat, or council. Once the realm only of men, now women have the chance to slowly push for greater gender equality. Such greater equality could see more girls given an education – unleashing the power of women in rural India’s economy and lifting communities out of poverty.

Jeevika Trust is a UK charity supporting rural India. Please donate it a follow on Twitter  and a like on Facebook.